lovelondonscenes – 102

The muddy flats of the Thames as the tide drifts away. Photos taken yesterday afternoon, as I strolled from Putney to Chiswick. By the time I got to Chiswick Mall it was pretty much low tide.

Near Putney Bridge, looking upstream. Two football grounds in this photo. Fulham’s Craven Cottage on the right; and in the distance, the white arch of Wembley.

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Hammersmith, looking downstream towards the bridge.

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By Chiswick Mall, looking upstream – and into the sun.

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Concluded with a pint of the finest ale, in the Mawson Arms, the pub right next to the Fuller’s brewery. A thing of beauty!

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About John S

I'm blogging about the things I love outside work: music, sport, culture, London, with some photos to illustrate aspects of our wonderful city. And anything else that I happen to think is worth writing about!
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8 Responses to lovelondonscenes – 102

  1. Dood says:

    Nice one, John. Only you can make Hammersmith look quite so desirable!

    Sorry I missed the chance of a pint in the Mawson – I was out chugging Malbec with a famously bibulous client publisher. But we’ll meet up again soon, I hope.

    I see you’re reading James Shapiro’s “1599 – A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare”. I read it a couple of years ago and absolutely loved it – not only for its brilliant insights into Shakespeare, but also as a reminder of what a riveting time the turn of that century was, culturally, socially, and politically. I thought Shapiro combined superb biographical writing with a wonderful historical perspective. Very impressive,

    • John S says:

      Remarkable how quiet it was down by the river at four in the afternoon, on a weekday. Quite serene – even eerie on the Putney to Hammersmith bit. I guess I’m used to cycling rather than walking it. Yes, reading the Shapiro on your recommendation. Agree with your comments, though every now and then I felt he went on a bit – for example the battles in Ireland and some of the stuff about print editions. I liked the way he put the 1599 plays in political and cultural context, and it certainly makes me want to see/read Henry V and Hamlet again, and Julius Caesar and As You Like It probably for the first time (unless we snuck them in at school). But, as with the Bryson book, you also come away with the sense that we know remarkably little about Shakespeare the man.

  2. dc says:

    Good observation skills by Dood to spot the book. I was consumed with desire by the picture of the foaming ale.

  3. I quite like that ending 😉

  4. Resa says:

    Neat pics!
    I wouldn’t mind a pint of red wine in that cool looking glass. 🙂

  5. John S says:

    That would be a lot of wine!

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